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  • Austria - Identifying trafficking survivors
  • Austria
  • The first interview with asylum seekers, particularly women, at basic care centres in Austria, for example, always addresses the issue of trafficking in human beings so as to see if applicants need special support as required by Article 17 of the Reception Conditions Directive. Female staff is available for this task. Possible victims are accommodated in a women’s shelter in the first reception centre Traiskirchen. Female psychologists, who may be consulted twice a week, may also assist with identifying victims. Three of the Member States covered in this report systematically use the initial health check upon arrival for identification purposes: In Austria, Bulgaria and Croatia, healthcare staff pay special attention to possible signs of human trafficking based on training and/or guidance provided to them. Efforts to improve the identification of child victims of trafficking in Austria include focused training and cooperation between the police and child and youth authorities, as well as the Austrian Task Force Against Human Trafficking.
  • Practice
  • Screening & Assessment
  • Vulnerability
  • Trafficked
  • Women
  • Italy - IOM supporting authorities to identify trafficked persons among new arrivals and transfer to reception centre for further assessment and support
  • Italy
  • In Italy, the International Organization for Migration (IOM) supports the authorities in identifying victims of trafficking among new arrivals. Disembarkation facilities in Italy are generally unsuitable for identification purposes as they offer insufficient privacy and safety, particularly when victims arrive together with their traffickers. The main constraint is the limited amount of time available upon arrival for establishing trust with the victims. The presence of cultural mediators from the same geographical background as the victims has been a positive factor increasing the willingness of women to report information on their trafficking background. If a victim is identified during disembarkation, IOM contacts the competent Prefecture to ensure immediate separation and transfer to a reception centre. IOM interviews female victims for a second time at the receptions centres, assessing the need to refer them to a specialised protection facility.
  • Practice
  • Screening & Assessment
  • Vulnerability
  • Trafficked
  • Women
  • Transit
  • Tailored reception for women and unaccompanied children in Austria
  • Austria
  • At the initial reception centres in Austria, there are separate houses for women and unaccompanied children. Support and care are generally provided 24/7. There is an information point. Psychologists are available for crisis interventions. Several security measures are in place at the initial reception centres where victims are placed: female staff, including female security staff, work there and access is refused to men; the police is present and there is video surveillance. In case of transfers, children below the age of 14 are always accompanied the entire way to their destination by staff. The initial reception centres have to report on a regular basis on the number of unaccompanied children present there.
  • Practice
  • Placement Options
  • Community without conditions
  • Migrants
  • Women
  • Policy mandating the consideration of alternatives to detention in Canada
  • Canada
  • Citizenship and Immigration Canada, Enforcement Manual 20 (ENF 20)- Officers must be aware that alternatives to detention exist. As an alternative to detention, an officer may impose conditions, require a deposit of money or direct that a person participate in a third party risk management program ( para 5.11). Officers must also consider alternatives to detention and ensure detention is avoided or considered as a last resort for: the elderly, pregnant, sick, handicapped, mentally ill, and with behavioural problems, where safety or security is not an issue - (5.13). Also, in making a decision to detain or release, officers must consider the existence of alternatives to detention (see 5.9), detention is feasible where alternatives to detention are not avaialble to mitigate any risk to public safety or flight risk (5.9).
  • Policy
  • Liberty
  • Only permit detention when alternatives cannot be applied
  • Migrants
  • Women